Most seriously, Capitalism can have the effect of causing inequality and ineffective distribution of wealth across geographic, ethnic, gender and religious arena's and can have the effect of consolidating and strengthening class barriers. Due to persistent demands for deregulation and legislative freedoms by advocates of Capitalism, excessive mismanagement often occurs leading to economic disruption in the economy such as excessive growth or contraction. This can have serious consequences for much of the populace, most especially the elderly, infirm, disabled or poor. In addition, Capitalism's propensity for endless growth and consumption can cause serious loss of confidence in society among members of the populace concerned with sustainability and the longer-term welfare of the nation state. Environmental degradation, conflict, corruption, cartels, monopoly and fraud also regularly impair the nation state and cause excessive expense to the public purse.

American Multinational Capitalism.

For many, Capitalism as it is now practised is responsible for gross inequality along with high unemployment, low income, high poverty and astronomical increases in relative income with major and serious distance between wealthy and poor.

Above all, it is responsible for a class system defined by economic articulation of monetary privilege.

Picture Terence Bunch.

In its puritanical form, the term Capitalism can be used to describe the principle of private ownership of the means of production in an economy and the principle of ownership of the resultant profits from the 'capitalisation' of that production. In its logical form, Capitalism describes exploitation of material resources of a territory for the purpose of maintaining the power of a unitary authority - in order to affect identifiable sovereignty. In its ideological form, Capitalism describes the equitable distribution of resources amongst a populace in order to maintain the populace above absolute poverty.

In all cases, Capitalism requires the monetisation of resources and once acquired, further requires the development of monetary policy to engineer logical increases in the value of monetisation over time.

The Violence of Capitalism.

The Violence of Capitalism.

Libya. Throughout this era of Globalisation, war and conflict has been a persistant and agonising blight on the people of the Middle-East and elsewhere.

Accompanying this violence, has been the seemingly endless tirade of volatile right-wing polemic practised by politicians from those nations that have attempted to lead the expansion of Capitalism throughout the world via Globalisation.

Picture: Uncredited.

The term Globalisation describes the internationalisation of Capitalism in puritanical, logical or ideological form in order to effect international alignment of states, governments or unitary authorities around a single economic pole. Like Capitalism, Globalisation can be described in puritanical, logical or ideological form. In its puritanical form, Globalisation describes the internationalisation of the principle of private ownership of the means of production and ownership of the resultant profits derived from the 'capitalisation' of that production. In logical form, Globalisation describes the internationalisation of the exploitation of material resources for the purpose of maintaining the power of a unitary authority - in order to affect identifiable sovereignty. In its ideological form, Globalisation describes the internationalisation of the distribution of resources throughout the global populace in order to maintain the populace above absolute poverty.

Globalisation, like Capitalism, also requires the monetisation of global resources and once acquired, further requires the development of globalised monetary policy to engineer logical increases in the value of globalised monetisation over time.

Range.


Worldwide Gross Domestic Product.

Worldwide Gross Domestic Product.

Total worldwide GDP (Gross Domestic Product) density around the world is measured in this map with high concentrations of wealth heavily concentrated in China, Russia, India, Germany, France, Italy, the United Kingdom, the United States and Brazil.

The epicenter of wealth in the world is placed in northern China and central and northern Europe.

Picture: Columbia University, US. 1999.

In 2011, compelling evidence exists of international Globalisation and Capitalisation throughout most of the larger nations of the world including China, the Russian Federation, India, Brazil, the United States, Germany, France, Italy and the United Kingdom.

Among these nations, single economic policy has emerged convincingly throughout the military, political and economic arena's.

Scope.


Over the course of its life, Capitalism has brought forward many national and international trading entities to articulate its agenda to government and foreign corporations. Globalisation has followed suit with a plethora of institutions such as the IMF (International Monetary Fund), the World Bank, the G8/G12/G20, the WTO (World Trade Organisation) and the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). In the period up to and including 2006, these organisations executed international monetary policy through the setting of tariffs, trading regimes and financial security which changed in 2008/2009 to the execution of economic crisis, direct market intervention and debt volatility.

Expendable Commodities.

Expendable Commodities.

Illustration: ©Kirk Anderson.

Effects.


The effects of Capitalism in society are known and quantifiable.

Most seriously, Capitalism can have the effect of causing inequality and ineffective distribution of wealth across geographic, ethnic, gender and religious arena's and can have the effect of consolidating and strengthening class barriers. Due to persistent demands for deregulation and legislative freedoms by advocates of Capitalism, excessive mismanagement often occurs leading to economic disruption in the economy such as excessive growth or contraction. This can have serious consequences for much of the populace, most especially the elderly, infirm, disabled or poor. In addition, Capitalism's propensity for endless growth and consumption can cause serious loss of confidence in society among members of the populace concerned with sustainability and the longer-term welfare of the nation state. Environmental degradation, conflict, corruption, cartels, monopoly and fraud also regularly impair the nation state and cause excessive expense to the public purse.

Globalisation has the effect of internationalising these problems and accelerating regional disputes.

Corporate Policing of the Occupy Movement.

Corporate Policing of the Occupy Movement.

A police officer enacts Government policy and beats an 'Occupy Oakland' citizen after the encampment assembles to protest chronic debt and the defenestration of public wealth in the US. The United States is a major advocate of Globalisation and has sought pole position in leading its internationalisation.

Many now accept that this is due the United States being unable to field any Government other than stridently Capitalist. The United States is unable to present any Government not strongly right wing in economic policy making, foreign policy and welfare provision. For its entire history, the United States has been unable to provide or bring into existance any coherent welfare provision policy for its populace.

In much of the United States, emergency personnel treat emergency medical care as a secondary concern with many US citizens receiving medical treatment from police or firefighter crews, even to the point of being escorted into hospital and treated in triage or emergency rooms.

Picture: CNN.

Political effect.


Among the nations of the world in which Globalisation is a major actor in domestic policy, government posture and political purpose has evolved to such a degree that those governments now present politically as homogenous and single issue. Almost universally, it can be seen that those governments affected have adopted the polity of the free-market and have, as a result, become stridently right wing in political outlook. This tendency is seen not only in domestic economic policy, but in areas in which it is undesirable such as foreign policy, domestic welfare provision and international diplomacy.

Throughout the first decade of the 21st century, persistent extremism has been witnessed throughout the western world and increasingly in nations exposed to the agenda of Globalisation. From the virulent and volatile posturing of the Republican Bush administration to the stridently populist and violent stance of the British Labour administration during prosecution of the disastrous so-called War on Terror, and onto the revolting banning of religious dress in France; the sum political effect of Globalisation has been to sterilise governments around the world by exposing them to the mindless and uncritical thinking of the human race as a commodity and little else.

Agitation and disruption.


Throughout the recent era of Globalisation, strident and comprehensive opposition has been seen throughout the world with western nations in particular experiencing explosions in targeted protests aimed against the symbols of Globalisation and Capitalism. These protests have taken place in the UK, the US, France, Germany, Italy, Greece, Spain, Ireland, Russia, Australia, New Zealand, Iceland, India, Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Canada and Portugal. To date and covering the period from 1999, an estimated 11 million people have taken part in direct action against the principle symbols of Globalist and Capitalist enterprise.