The effectiveness of the church throughout the War on Terror period has been, like most other humane institutions, undermined by extremist dogma emanating from outside the church itself. In the lead up to the full deployment of their military forces in Afghanistan and then Iraq, both the United Kingdom and United States governments expended considerable energy in deflecting the public discourse away from an anti-war stance. This was joined by extremists from the domestic left and right wings along with opportunist Zionist and pro-democracy Muslims all competing with each other to fully exploit the United States and United Kingdoms military deployments for tactical and strategic effect. In the midst of this extreme feeding frenzy, the church often found itself swamped and unable to dismember these voices in any meaningful way.

The Occupy Movement.

The Occupy movement in London has managed to remain in place throughout the later part of 2011 and has survived into 2012 at the base of St Pauls Cathedral. St Pauls is a Church of England cathedral dedicated to Paul the Apostle [born AD 5 died AD 67], a Roman citizen who enjoyed privilege in Roman society in law and in terms of ownership of property.

Paul was an ethnic Jew and obeyed Judaic moral lore. He held views regarding the ethnic superiority of the lineage of Jews at odds with Judao-ontological dogma but accepted and maintained the rights of the children of Israel as being especially reserved before Gods grace. Paul accepted that Jews were part of God, but rejected the ethnic primacy of the Jew as the original identity of mankind.

The Occupy movement has assembled here on the steps of St Pauls the cathedral of Paul the Apostle, at a time when the historic didactic of ethnic Jewish primacy is in the final stages of complex and wideranging rejection.

Picture: Georgie Gillard Press Association.

Over the past several decades, western Capitalism has undergone an ideological overhaul and re-adjustment. This has been undertaken by economic theorists and has left much of the western world with model Capitalism that is over-managed, impractical and unmanageable. Freedom and de-regulation of the Capitalist markets has been advocated by economists proposing the principle of absolute freedom of trade as a suitable architecture for the construction of domestic and international Capitalism. The result of this ideological 'freedom' has been the building of a market-place using the very same principles most often attributed to articulate the concept of human rights. There has been an attempt to 'humanise' Capitalism by imparting onto it, the rights of the individual human being, along with associated privileges.

This process of absolute de-regulation and freedom to trade within Capitalism has been led by theoretical and industrial Capitalist economists using mathematics and algebra in an attempt to reach perfection of Capitalism through attainment of mathematical beauty. This process has been adopted by both 'left' and 'right' wings in their search for a working model for principle Globalisation under the model of Capitalism.

What has resulted is not economic simplicity and Capitalist elegance, but 'Capitalism beatification' at the expense of basic economic practicality. Today's Capitalist economic systems are now excessively convoluted and ontologically unmanageable. As a result, much of the instrumentation of Capitalism is separated and hidden away from the general populace by Capitalism slang and convoluted monetary syntax. For many, a new Capitalist elite 'economia' has emerged using defenestration of the public wealth as its primary funding device toward global influence. Its primary method has been the strategic grammatical use of this slang and syntax for effect. And as a result of this, and as we move into 2012, major worldwide anti-Capitalist movements for justice are now appearing positioned around an anti-Capitalism axis with a pivoting point positioned dead centre on western financial Capitalist institutions.

Occupy London has formed at close proximity to model Capitalism as a result of chronic inequity and disparity of wealth which has become the primary flaw of Capitalism in the western world. From its humble beginnings, Occupy London has assembled under a clear ideological sky and articulated its anti-Capitalist aims and motifs in a clear logical manner. Despite this clarity, the 'left' and 'right' wings in both the United States and United Kingdom have broadly failed, by choice, to 'see' the Occupy movement in general, or the massed non-aligned public it represents.

For the US/UK political extreme, division and conflict are populist science and ordinary day to day method. It is here, that the extreme wings betray their adherents to the status quo, and are revealed as architects to the effects of the status quo, that being corruption, wealth inequity, war and public servitude. This science is absent from the Occupy movement, and consequently, so the UK 'extreme' are absent from Occupy London.

The Church


Casting the Money-lenders out from the Temple.

Casting the Money-lenders out from the Temple.

Jesus, a prophet of God, enters the Temple of Jerusalem and drives out the money-changers and sellers entrenched inside. In one of the most telling and prominant passages of the Christian New Testament, the prophet enacts the will of his faith onto the corrupt and turns over the bedrock of humanities great and most persistant reversals.

In Matthew 21:12 (King James) Jesus turns over a table on which doves are being sold for a ransom and then expels the seller from the Temple.

The Occupy movement in London remains a modern day compelling example of this same display of equity and justice and should serve as a mechanism around which the church can rotate. Instead, the Church is struggling with the message being given by Occupy London and is at risk of betraying its political agenda, rather than correctly identifying its ecumenical equinox. At a time of war, nepotism, corruption and brazen injustice, the churches role is clear.

Over the course of 2011 the London Occupy encampment has been under continuous attack from members of both the extreme political wings. This has taken the form of wayward criticism articulated through wilful misunderstanding of the anti-Capitalism motifs that have been presented by Occupy London itself. The criticism has taken populist form and has been revealed through mainstream media sources. In an attempt to rob and derail the anti-Capitalism campaign structure of Occupy London, the 'left' in particular have made continuous reference to narratives which it has, unsuccessfully, attempted to inject into the Occupy movement using the glue of criticism. This was joined by 'right' wing populist assaults involving juvenile narratives of the personal hygiene of Occupy London adherents along with add-hominem attacks and generally infantile mockery.

In October 2011, both narratives became quickly exhausted after it became apparent the church had a pre-existing sympathy with Occupy London. At once, the left and right wing fled the Occupy movement and abandoned their attempts to critique the Occupy campaign by using the dark arts of poli-sci. The extreme's abandonment of their positions, has revealed the actuality of the political and religious order of the UK. The church clearly occupies a position of compelling superiority. As a result, the church has prompted an ecumenical debate regarding its role over the past decade in light of major financial and political nepotism in the midst of the most serious and grievous period of human rights abuses yet committed by the nations of the trans-Atlantic west. The debate entered into by the church, places Occupy London in a position of ideological primacy under which the structural problems encountered by the United Kingdom can be addressed outside of the flawed, divisive and de-stabilising narratives of the extreme left and right wings.

You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their high officials exercise authority over them. Not so with you. Instead, whoever wants to be great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be your slave - just as the son of man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as ransom for many.

- Matthew 20:25. [King James]

The effectiveness of the church throughout the War on Terror period has been, like most other humane institutions, undermined by extremist dogma emanating from outside the church itself. In the lead up to the full deployment of their military forces in Afghanistan and then Iraq, both the United Kingdom and United States governments expended considerable energy in deflecting the public discourse away from an anti-war stance. This was joined by extremists from the domestic left and right wings along with opportunist Zionist and pro-democracy Muslims all competing with each other to fully exploit the United States and United Kingdom's military deployments for tactical and strategic effect. In the midst of this extreme feeding frenzy, the church often found itself swamped and unable to dismember these voices in any meaningful way.

After the wars were waged and the errors of these deployments became apparent with the widespread collapse of economic markets the world over, this feeding frenzy dissipated as the antagonists put distance between themselves and the disastrous wars in order to protect their public positions. As this process of dissipation went on, the church slowly found that it could once again clearly articulate its views. In 2011, after a period of experimentation and trial and error, the church found its voice once again and began to assert its authority.

What it has inherited, is a public totem that has formed from the wreckage of the collapse of the 'left' and 'right' wings, the hidden economia and a Governmental system in advanced state of ideological crisis and collapse. The Occupy London movement allows for the facilitation of that totem's now naturalised anti-Capitalism interests at a time when the traditional dividing line of left versus right is too divided to articulate their own stable or progressive narratives. This legacy appears at the epicentre of the world's foreign exchange mechanism and at the crossroads of Capitalism and the newly appearing post Capitalism economia.

Political extremism.


Extreme Nationalist Violence.

Extreme Nationalist Violence.

In this image, Norway becomes the latest victim of political extremism as a large bomb explodes in a commercial district of Oslo in 2011.

The bombing is initially beleived, and reported, to be the work of al-Qa'ida but is quickly revised and found to be the work of a far right extremist. Anders Behring Breivik, a Norwegian national with links to a number of far right groups in the EU, is an early adopter of the new political homogeneity between far right and the far left.

Common to both movements is strident anti-semitism and anti-Islamism. The Oslo bombing kills 7 and a short while later, Breivik attacks a group of socialists on a holiday Island in Norway, killing a further 85.

Over the course of the past three years, it has become apparent in the US and UK that the political environment has required a motivation toward tactical extremism and the appearance of the credo of extremist violence. In the United Kingdom, this has involved the encouragement of far right extremist groups onto the nation's streets. This extremism has appeared in numerous guises but has essentially confined its logic to violence and the threatened use of violence as social control mechanism.

While many may claim that the appearance of extremist far right groups is a naturally occurring result of defeat in war, and resultant swing toward nationalism, these groups are generally poorly educated, unable to autonomise or remain solvent without assistance.

The appearance of extremist groups in the UK is certainly the result of tactical cohesion between the right and left wings. Throughout the past thirty year period in the UK, far right and far left groups have often worked in tandem with each other in order to affect mutual interests and goals. This has clearly been in play in the 2009-2011 period.

The appearance of far right extremism, aided and abetted by far left organisational motivation, denotes an inability of the political extremes to provide an alternative narrative during periods of breakdown and failure. This inability to provide an alternative identifies the extreme wings of the mainstream political classes in the UK as generally unstable, non-progressive and lacking in ideological tolerance.

It is here, that the church may begin the work of articulating a contra Capitalist narrative of moderacy and tolerance along with a call for government intervention into economic planning in order to allow the United Kingdom to successfully migrate toward a hybrid economia, and formally into the post Capitalist and post extremist era. By undertaking this duty, the church can realise its natural humane obligations and qualification at a time of coherent social and political difficulty and rising religious fear among the UK populace.

References.


1. 'Un-occupy the City: Nine out of ten tents remain empty overnight at St Paul's protest camp' Daily Mail, London. 25th October 2011. Copyright Georgie Gillard/Press Association. (Warning: This article has been subject to numerous complaints about its accuracy). 2. 'Casting out the Money Changers' by Carl Heinrich Bloch. [1834 -1890]. 3. 'Norway gunman showed no mercy, boasting 'I'll kill you all'' Herald Sun. 24th July 2011. Copyright Fartein Rudjord/Associated Press.