Terence Bunch

Photojournalist & Writer

Two Colchester women, named Amber and Louisa, pose for a photograph after seeing a peace flag from across the street. London. 1st July 2010. All pictures © Terence Bunch.

Final Leg London Colchester Trail of Tears Peace Walk. Colchester. 1st July 2010.

By Published Last Edited 2010-07-01 00:00:00

After five days, and a pedometer reading standing at just short of 80 miles, 80 year old Malcolm Pittock successfully arrives in Colchester at the head of the Trail of Tears peace walk, which set out from Westminster in London five days ago.

He arrives in Colchester around mid afternoon and begins the walk through the town toward the Colchester War Memorial. Once again, the walk reveals endemic anti-war feeling in the barracks town consistent with that seen in every previous leg of the walk.

From Londons east end, to the conservative belt around Brentwood and from Chelmsford through to the barracks town of Colchester, members of the public display persistent opposition to the ongoing war and broad support for the peace walkers.

After a naming of the dead ceremony at the memorial, the walk heads out of the center and toward the Military Corrective Training Centre at Berechurch Hall Camp, currently holding in detention Lance Corporal Joe Glenton for refusing to serve in Afghanistan.

The walkers are joined by local anti-war groups. They arrive at the correction facility and together raise their voices in thanks to Joe Glenton, whos single act of defiance is now entirely representative of British public opinion.

The peace walk finishes as the War in Afghanistan descends into a disorganised mess with a deadly attack on a US facility. The attack kills a number of personnel and brings into doubt claims by the British Government that British Forces must remain in the country until Afghanis are able to maintain their own security.

The attack is almost certainly the result of police and Afghan army collusion with regional anti-occupation forces.

London. 1st July 2010.

80 year old Malcolm Pittock arrives at the head of the Trail of Tears Peace Walk into the barracks town of Colchester after walking almost 80 miles from London, through the Essex countryside and to the place where Joe Glenton is imprisoned for refusing to serve in Afghanistan. Along the way, endemic opposition to the war in Afghanistan is encountered among the ordinary public.

80 year old Malcolm Pittock arrives at the head of the Trail of Tears Peace Walk into the barracks town of Colchester after walking almost 80 miles from London, through the Essex countryside and to the place where Joe Glenton is imprisoned for refusing to serve in Afghanistan. Along the way, endemic opposition to the war in Afghanistan is encountered among the ordinary public.

Colchester residents prove to be friendly and interested in the walkers, consistent with every previous leg of the walk, from Whitechapel to Ilford, From Brentwood to Chelmsford and now into the home of many of the nations primary military regiments and battalions.

Colchester residents prove to be friendly and interested in the walkers, consistent with every previous leg of the walk, from Whitechapel to Ilford, From Brentwood to Chelmsford and now into the home of many of the nations primary military regiments and battalions.

Peace Campaigner, Maya Evans stands talking with a Colchester man about the war in Afghanistan while he reads a leaflet she has given him.

Peace Campaigner, Maya Evans stands talking with a Colchester man about the war in Afghanistan while he reads a leaflet she has given him.

The Peace Walkers gather around the Colchester War Memorial and hold a naming of the dead ceremony with other local anti-war groups.

The Peace Walkers gather around the Colchester War Memorial and hold a naming of the dead ceremony with other local anti-war groups.

Alice, one of the walkers who originally gathered in London before beginning the walk, and who has now completed almost 80 miles by the pedometer, bows her head as the names of British service personnel are read out alongside those Afghanis killed during the occupation.

Alice, one of the walkers who originally gathered in London before beginning the walk, and who has now completed almost 80 miles by the pedometer, bows her head as the names of British service personnel are read out alongside those Afghanis killed during the occupation.

The walk heads out of Colchester center and toward the south later arriving at the Berechurch Hall Camp, home to the Military Correction Training Facility where Lance Corporal Joe Glenton is currently serving a corrective sentence for refusing to serve in Afghanistan.

The walk heads out of Colchester center and toward the south later arriving at the Berechurch Hall Camp, home to the Military Correction Training Facility where Lance Corporal Joe Glenton is currently serving a corrective sentence for refusing to serve in Afghanistan.

Malcolm Pittock is invited to speak and outlines the fundamentally undemocratic nature of the army, and its role in informing the British people about deployments it is called to undertake. Throughout the wars in both Iraq and Afghanistan, senior military commanders have continually given interviews and statements to the media in order to underpin and shore up public opinion over the conflicts, a practice fundamentally unsound in any democracy, and persistently ineffectual in the United Kingdom.

Malcolm Pittock is invited to speak and outlines the fundamentally undemocratic nature of the army, and its role in informing the British people about deployments it is called to undertake. Throughout the wars in both Iraq and Afghanistan, senior military commanders have continually given interviews and statements to the media in order to underpin and shore up public opinion over the conflicts, a practice fundamentally unsound in any democracy, and persistently ineffectual in the United Kingdom.

The walk ends after almost 80miles, the revealing of endemic opposition to the war, and outside the gates of the camp that is holding a war resister, who by a single act of defiance, has done more to represent the British people than the entire combined weight of the British Government and its primary sidekick, a mindless and habitually under performing British media.

The walk ends after almost 80miles, the revealing of endemic opposition to the war, and outside the gates of the camp that is holding a war resister, who by a single act of defiance, has done more to represent the British people than the entire combined weight of the British Government and its primary sidekick, a mindless and habitually under performing British media.