Terence Bunch

Photojournalist & Writer

After several hours, and a punishing walk over uneven ground and through overgrowth, the peace walkers and Malcolm Pittock stop for a few moments to rest before setting off again in the direction of Chelmsford. Brentwood. 29th June 2010. All pictures © Terence Bunch.

Leg Three London Colchester Trail of Tears Peace Walk. Brentwood. 29th June 2010.

By Published Last Edited 2010-06-29 00:00:00

On the day the bodies of seven British servicemen are returned to the UK after being killed in Afghanistan by misadventure and hostile combat, the London to Colchester peace walkers set out on the third leg of their peace walk led by 80 year old peace activist and campaigner Malcom Pittock.

The walkers begin leg three from Brentwood Cathedral and make their way through Hutton, Shenfield and through the heart of the Essex countryside and into Chelmsford where they hold a ceremony to read out the names of those who have been killed in the now deeply unpopular war.

The leg is significant for passing through Brentwood, known to be a staunchly conservative area. The peace walk reveals anti-war sentiment amongst the local population consistent with that seen during its first leg from Whitechapel to Ilford. As the peace walkers pass through the town, broad support is again seen from pedestrians and those driving vehicles in traffic.

The peace walk is now approaching its final stages with the final leg ending in Colchester, home to Colchester barracks, currently holding in detention Lance Corporal Joe Glenton who has been imprisoned for refusing to serve in Afghanistan.

Brentwood. 29th June 2010.

The peace walkers head out into the heartland of Essex from Brentwood holding a large flag of Peace. The walk is now on its third leg and passes through Shenfield and on into Chelmsford. Along the way members of the public are given leaflets setting out the walks aims and outlining why, after nine years, the war in Afganistan must now be drawn down.

The peace walkers head out into the heartland of Essex from Brentwood holding a large flag of Peace. The walk is now on its third leg and passes through Shenfield and on into Chelmsford. Along the way members of the public are given leaflets setting out the walks aims and outlining why, after nine years, the war in Afganistan must now be drawn down.

Two local residents talk with a peace walker and read the leaflets given to them. Brentwood is a staunchly conservative area and traditionally serves as a commuter town for business and city workers due to its proximity to London. Broad support is shown to the peace walkers as they pass through, again contradicting the current false narrative that the British Government continue to deploy military forces in this conflict by the instruction of the British people.

Two local residents talk with a peace walker and read the leaflets given to them. Brentwood is a staunchly conservative area and traditionally serves as a commuter town for business and city workers due to its proximity to London. Broad support is shown to the peace walkers as they pass through, again contradicting the current false narrative that the British Government continue to deploy military forces in this conflict by the instruction of the British people.

A man stands waiting for a local bus while he reads a leaflet given to him as the walkers pass by. Interestingly, those who are given the leaflets do not fold and stow the leaflets or dispose of them, instead most are attentive to the leaflets contents and stop to read the leaflets at length.

A man stands waiting for a local bus while he reads a leaflet given to him as the walkers pass by. Interestingly, those who are given the leaflets do not fold and stow the leaflets or dispose of them, instead most are attentive to the leaflets contents and stop to read the leaflets at length.

The peace walkers pass through the urban belt of Brentwood and Shenfield and on into the rural heartland of Essex.

The peace walkers pass through the urban belt of Brentwood and Shenfield and on into the rural heartland of Essex.

Maya Evans stops to stroke a horse in a paddock in one of the many farms that the walkers pass.

Maya Evans stops to stroke a horse in a paddock in one of the many farms that the walkers pass.

The peace walkers head toward Galleywood where they intend to enter Chelmsford.

The peace walkers head toward Galleywood where they intend to enter Chelmsford.

As they approach southern Chelmsford, police arrive and close the main road into Chelmsford to allow the peace walkers to enter Hylands Park.

As they approach southern Chelmsford, police arrive and close the main road into Chelmsford to allow the peace walkers to enter Hylands Park.

After almost ten hours walking, the peace campaigners arrive at the war memorial in central Chelmsford and read the names of British service personnel who have been killed while in Afghanistan. The ceremony takes place on the day another seven bodies arrive back in the UK after losing their lives in Afghanistan, a conflict that has now dragged along for nine years with little or no sign of control over its prosecution by either the US or British Governments.

After almost ten hours walking, the peace campaigners arrive at the war memorial in central Chelmsford and read the names of British service personnel who have been killed while in Afghanistan. The ceremony takes place on the day another seven bodies arrive back in the UK after losing their lives in Afghanistan, a conflict that has now dragged along for nine years with little or no sign of control over its prosecution by either the US or British Governments.