Terence Bunch

Photojournalist & Writer

The Peace Walkers enter the Whitechapel district of London, itself host to a large muslim quarter. In recent months, this district has been targeted by English loyalists posing as Fascists with the aim of provoking local violence in the area, violence that is intended to undermine the British muslim community and consolidate the continuing war in Afghanistan. Throughout the passage of the Peace walkers through this district, universal support for the anti-war cause is encountered and no known support for the war is detected. London. 27th June 2010. All pictures © Terence Bunch.

Five Day Trail of Tears Peace Walk to Colchester. London. 27th June 2010.

By Published Last Edited 2010-06-27 00:00:00

On a day of searing heat, peace campaigners assemble in London to begin a five day peace walk from London to Colchester to continue to oppose the war in Afghanistan and to bring attention to the detention of Joe Glenton, currently serving a military sentence for refusing to serve in Afghanistan.

The walk begins outside the British MOD (Ministry of Defence) building in Whitehall Place and makes its way to Ilford to complete its first day.

The walk passes through the East End of London where leaflets are given out and members of the public are directly engaged with the cause of peace.

Throughout the first leg, no meaningful support for the continuing war is detected among the ordinary public and broad support for the walkers is given from those walking along the streets and driving in traffic.

In the early afternoon, the walkers pass through the Whitechapel area of London, an area with a heavy muslim quarter who are currently being targeted by state sponsored white loyalist groups who have been attempting to raise local conflict in order to consolidate the war nationally.

As a result, the area is now generally anti-war in sentiment.

The walk reveals a level of public support for the drawing down of the Afghanistan war that fits poorly with recent statements by the new British coalition Government PM David Cameron who, in recent days, has attempted to infer that British forces will remain in Afghanistan for the lifetime of this Parliament, suggesting that the current coalition Government is unlikely to survive its full term.

London. 27th June 2010.

The walkers make their way out of Central London and on toward the Commercial Road area after assembling at the British MOD (Ministry of Defence) building in Whitehall. They have assembled to continue to campaign against the war in Afghanistan and to bring attention to the military sentence being served by war resister, Joe Glenton, at Colchester Barracks.

The walkers make their way out of Central London and on toward the Commercial Road area after assembling at the British MOD (Ministry of Defence) building in Whitehall. They have assembled to continue to campaign against the war in Afghanistan and to bring attention to the military sentence being served by war resister, Joe Glenton, at Colchester Barracks.

They arrive at the Tower Hill area and begin to hand out leaflets to tourists, ordinary Londoners and younger armed forces members.

They arrive at the Tower Hill area and begin to hand out leaflets to tourists, ordinary Londoners and younger armed forces members.

They make their way past the Tower of London and begin the main part of the first leg of the peace walk, the walk through the Commercial Road district of Greater London. Throughout, the walk is led by a large Peace banner.

They make their way past the Tower of London and begin the main part of the first leg of the peace walk, the walk through the Commercial Road district of Greater London. Throughout, the walk is led by a large Peace banner.

Two young men demand to have their pictures taken with the anti-war leaflets that the walkers have been handing out. From Whitechapel to Ilford, the walkers encounter major support from members of the public convincingly undermining the false narrative that is ongoing amongst the British Government and British media in their efforts to keep the war alive.

Two young men demand to have their pictures taken with the anti-war leaflets that the walkers have been handing out. From Whitechapel to Ilford, the walkers encounter major support from members of the public convincingly undermining the false narrative that is ongoing amongst the British Government and British media in their efforts to keep the war alive.

In temperatures that at one point reach almost 33 degrees centigrade, the walkers continue on through the east end of London and on toward Ilford War Memorial at Newbury Park.

In temperatures that at one point reach almost 33 degrees centigrade, the walkers continue on through the east end of London and on toward Ilford War Memorial at Newbury Park.

At one point along the Commercial Road, the campaigners are forced to stop in order to hand out leaflets to members of the public who line up to take the leaflets.

At one point along the Commercial Road, the campaigners are forced to stop in order to hand out leaflets to members of the public who line up to take the leaflets.

The march heads into the last stretch of the first leg and meanders through the streets of Ilford around the Cranbrook Road Valentines Park area. At its head is 80 year old Malcom Pittock, a former member of the Bolton STW CND groups. Despite his age, he continues throughout the walk without a single complaint.

The march heads into the last stretch of the first leg and meanders through the streets of Ilford around the Cranbrook Road Valentines Park area. At its head is 80 year old Malcom Pittock, a former member of the Bolton STW CND groups. Despite his age, he continues throughout the walk without a single complaint.

The first leg of the Walk for Peace ends at Ilford War Memorial where the names of those who have tragically died during the war are read out in a sombre act of remembrance. The walk will continue for the next five days until it reaches Colchester.

The first leg of the Walk for Peace ends at Ilford War Memorial where the names of those who have tragically died during the war are read out in a sombre act of remembrance. The walk will continue for the next five days until it reaches Colchester.