Terence Bunch

Photojournalist & Writer

Lance Corporal Joe Glenton currently serving with the Royal Logistic Corps assembles with others at the head of the march prior to moving off. While there have been many protests regarding British involvement in Iraq, this is the first massed gathering single issue protest to take place regarding Afghanistan. Recent polls confirm that the British people no longer believe that the conflict can be won. London. 24th October 2009. All pictures © Terence Bunch.

Troops Out of Afghanistan Anti War March and Protest. London. 24th October 2009.

By Published Last Edited 2009-10-24 00:00:00

As the British and US Governments military campaign in Afghanistan falls into debacle with the failure of the so-called democratic Government of Hamid Karzai, and against a backdrop of increasing British military casualties from sporadic engagements with Afghani regional partisans, thousands of anti-war campaigners gather in London to compose the nations answer to the now failed conflict a year after the British economy is ravaged by the collapsed so-called War on Terror.

They assemble at Hyde Park and march to Trafalgar Square. They are joined by Lance Corporal Joe Glenton, currently serving with the Royal Logistic Corps and Peter Brierley who recently lost his son, Lance Corporal Shaun Brierley in Iraq.

To date, a total of 222 soldiers have been killed in Afghanistan, many of them in the last year. Between the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 and 2006, 7 soldiers were killed.

This increased between 2006 and the end of 2008 to 133.

This year alone, 94 soldiers have died. Throughout, the British Labour Government have chosen a defensive, stepping-stone approach to explain and justify these deaths. An approach which has now been dismissed by the domestic population.

London. 24th October 2009.

Joe is joined by other campaigners who have lost family members during the misadventure. On the far left is Peter Brierley who recently lost his son, Lance Corporal Shaun Brierley in Iraq.

Joe is joined by other campaigners who have lost family members during the misadventure. On the far left is Peter Brierley who recently lost his son, Lance Corporal Shaun Brierley in Iraq.

A large banner is held up demanding that the government concentrate funding of education at a time of chronic economic hardship. As a result of British involvement in the collapsed War on Terror, and the resultant collapse of western stock exchanges, Britain is now suffering a debt burden not previously seen in its history. In recent days a sixth consecutive quarter of recession has been reported indicating that the British labour Government have misled the nation over the scale of the underlying problem they have caused.

A large banner is held up demanding that the government concentrate funding of education at a time of chronic economic hardship. As a result of British involvement in the collapsed War on Terror, and the resultant collapse of western stock exchanges, Britain is now suffering a debt burden not previously seen in its history. In recent days a sixth consecutive quarter of recession has been reported indicating that the British labour Government have misled the nation over the scale of the underlying problem they have caused.

The march heads out into London and snakes through the streets on its way to Trafalgar Square. Later in the day, the Thomson Reuters news-service reports that the march is attended by hundreds, not thousands of campaigners. They also choose to report that British public opinion regarding the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan has dropped. The report is a prime example of how the British Government are able to colourise reporting of the war in order to misdirect public opinion.

The march heads out into London and snakes through the streets on its way to Trafalgar Square. Later in the day, the Thomson Reuters news-service reports that the march is attended by hundreds, not thousands of campaigners. They also choose to report that British public opinion regarding the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan has dropped. The report is a prime example of how the British Government are able to colourise reporting of the war in order to misdirect public opinion.

Ordinary bystanders stand in Piccadilly Circus taking pictures on cameras and mobile phones as the march passes by. Along the route of the march, many bystanders clap and cheer the marchers in support.

Ordinary bystanders stand in Piccadilly Circus taking pictures on cameras and mobile phones as the march passes by. Along the route of the march, many bystanders clap and cheer the marchers in support.

The march begins to enter Trafalgar Square.

The march begins to enter Trafalgar Square.

A man holds a banner in reference to the underlying mood of many in Britain today. The arrest, detention and trial of former British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, for falsely reporting the threat to Britain of the then sovereign nation of Iraq. For many, the matter is controversial, and for many more, the matter involves current PM Gordon Brown, his refusal to call an election and the so-called rivalry between them. Mr Brown has consistently refused to counter any charge of criminal conduct against the former PM.

A man holds a banner in reference to the underlying mood of many in Britain today. The arrest, detention and trial of former British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, for falsely reporting the threat to Britain of the then sovereign nation of Iraq. For many, the matter is controversial, and for many more, the matter involves current PM Gordon Brown, his refusal to call an election and the so-called rivalry between them. Mr Brown has consistently refused to counter any charge of criminal conduct against the former PM.

Another campaigner holds up a placard depicting the image of British National Party leader, Nick Griffin. Just a few days previously, Mr Griffin appeared on British television alongside members of the Conservative and Labour parties. The appearance allowed for a cross-party assault of the ultra-nationalist and a political re-positioning of the mainstream political parties post financial-crisis.

Another campaigner holds up a placard depicting the image of British National Party leader, Nick Griffin. Just a few days previously, Mr Griffin appeared on British television alongside members of the Conservative and Labour parties. The appearance allowed for a cross-party assault of the ultra-nationalist and a political re-positioning of the mainstream political parties post financial-crisis.

Three young women hold up peace placards outside the National Gallery. The march has been predominantly attended by young people, many of whom will be voting for the first time in June 2010.

Three young women hold up peace placards outside the National Gallery. The march has been predominantly attended by young people, many of whom will be voting for the first time in June 2010.